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Linux Installation

Reference Number: AA-00628 Views: 40325 0 Rating/ Voters

The following instructions will cover installation on Linux systems. Note that Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS are the only Linux distributions supported by LumenVox.

Installation will require root privileges.

Note that Part 6 of our 7-Part Video Series on Installing and Configuring Asterisk 13 shows the process of installing LumenVox on a Linux system - this installation process is essentially the same sequence needed for installing LumenVox on any CentOS or RHEL system, so may be helpful to you on our LVDN site.


Using YUM to Install and Update

The tool YUM can be used to easily manage your LumenVox installations. Using YUM is the recommended approach for installing LumenVox Linux installation packages.

LumenVox provides a YUM repository at http://www.lumenvox.com/packages/. Each OS distribution has its own sub-directory.

First, create a file named LumenVox.repo in /etc/yum.repos.d/ as described below:

64-bit CentOS7 / RHEL7


NOTE: Support for 64-bit CentOS7 / RHEL7 was introduced with LumenVox 13.1, so this section only relates to that version or newer.

For RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7 and CentOS 7, modify your   /etc/yum.repos.d/LumenVox.repo  file (creating it if necessary) to contain the following text, which specifies the CentOS7 / RHEL7 64-bit LumenVox repository to use (or, you can simply copy this text into the file):


###################################################
[LumenVox]
name=LumenVox Products x86_64
baseurl=http://www.LumenVox.com/packages/EL7/x86_64/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0
###################################################


 32-Bit Support Added in 15.0.100  

32-bit CentOS7 / RHEL7


NOTE: Support for 32-bit CentOS7 / RHEL7 was introduced with LumenVox 15.0.100, so this section only relates to that version or newer.

For RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7 and CentOS 7, modify your   /etc/yum.repos.d/LumenVox.repo  file (creating it if necessary) to contain the following text, which specifies the CentOS7 / RHEL7 32-bit LumenVox repository to use (or, you can simply copy this text into the file):


###################################################
[LumenVox]
name=LumenVox Products i386
baseurl=http://www.LumenVox.com/packages/EL7/i386/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0
###################################################


64-bit CentOS6 / RHEL6


NOTE: Only 64-bit packages are supported for CentOS6 / RHEL6

For RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6 and CentOS 6, modify your   /etc/yum.repos.d/LumenVox.repo  file (creating it if necessary) to contain the following text, which specifies the CentOS6 / RHEL6 64-bit LumenVox repository to use (or, you can simply copy this text into the file):


###################################################
[LumenVox]
name=LumenVox Products x86_64
baseurl=http://www.LumenVox.com/packages/EL6/x86_64/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0
###################################################


 CentOS5 / RHEL5 Support Removed in 15.0.100  

CentOS5 / RHEL5


OBSOLETE: As of LumenVox version 15.0, CentOS5 / RHEL5 are no longer supported, since they are reaching end of life. We recommend all users migrate to later versions, which will continue to provide better support. Users may use versions up to and including LumenVox 14.2.100, while still in their support window, if they wish to continue running these older Operating Systems until they are able to migrate to newer versions.

F or 32-bit CentOS5 / RHEL5 users, your /etc/yum.repos.d/LumenVox.repo file (creating it if necessary) to contain the following (or, you can simply copy this text into the file) :


###################################################
[LumenVox]
name=LumenVox Products i386
baseurl=http://www.LumenVox.com/packages/EL5/i386/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0
###################################################

And for 64-bit CentOS5 / RHEL5 users, your /etc/yum.repos.d/LumenVox.repo file (creating it if necessary) to contain the following (or, you can simply copy this text into the file) :


###################################################
[LumenVox]
name=LumenVox Products x86_64
baseurl=http://www.LumenVox.com/packages/EL5/x86_64/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0
###################################################


Installation

Once the repository is configured, you can use yum to automatically download and install the packages. From a command line, you may then type yum install <package>, replacing package with the appropriate package name.

The available packages are:

  • LumenVoxCore which contains core files shared across all packages. This is required, and will be installed as dependency by yum, if needed.
  • LumenVoxClient which contains the speech client.
  • LumenVoxSRE which contains the speech server.
  • LumenVoxLicenseServer which contains the License Server.
  • LumenVoxMediaServer which contains both the MRCPv1 and MRCPv2 Server.
  • LumenVoxTTS contains the text-to-speech server, required for a TTS installation.

Typical installations will require the Client, SRE, and License Server packages and the Media Server (if your platform uses MRCP). If TTS is required, then the TTS package will also be installed. To download and install everything for a typical installation, you could run the following command:

yum install LumenVoxClient LumenVoxSRE LumenVoxMediaServer LumenVoxTTS LumenVoxLicenseServer

If you receive an error about a missing dependency related to a package with js in the name, please see "Libjs Problems on Red Hat ES or CentOS" below.

The necessary scripts to start the products are placed in /etc/init.d/ and are called lvmanagerd (the manager service), lvsred (the speech server), lvlicensed (the License Server), lvmediaserverd and lvttsd. They are not started by default after installation -- you must either start them using the service name start command or executing them directly.

After you have installed the software, see Licensing Overview to get started licensing your software.

If you have trouble with the installation, consider posting a request for assistance in the LumenVox Installation and Configuration section of our Developer Forums.

Language and Voice Packs

You may also download and install additional language packs for the Speech Engine (US English is included in the default SRE package). These are all best installed using yum as described above. The package names are as follows:

  • LumenVox-AustralianEnglishSREModel
  • LumenVox-BrazilianPortugueseSREModel
  • LumenVox-BritishEnglishSREModel
  • LumenVox-CanadianFrenchSREModel
  • LumenVox-ColombianSpanishSREModel
  • LumenVox-IndianEnglishSREModel
  • LumenVox-MexicanSpanishSREModel
       

When installing the LumenVox TTS Server, you must install at least one TTS voice. You should install only the voices that you have bought (or plan to buy) licenses for. If you do not know which voices you have licensed, please contact LumenVox support. See the complete LumenVox TTS Voices listing for details (as of release 10.5, the voice names have changed. please contact support for help with installing or upgrading earlier versions).

The format for the name of packages for TTS voices is LumenVox-Name-VoiceDB where Name is the name of the individual voice. An example name would be

  • LumenVox-Chris-VoiceDB

22 kHz voices are also available by using LumenVox-Name_22-VoiceDB. Most customers should just use the default 8 kHz voices, however, as the 22 kHz voices are not supported over MRCP and require special licensing.

Updating your software

The tool YUM can be used to easily keep your node up-to-date, both for system packages and LumenVox products. The command to use is

yum update

Be aware that updating the software does not automatically restart the services. You thus should stop all LumenVox services before invoking yum update, and start them up again after the update is complete. Some system updates may require a reboot, too.

Updating the system packages only

By default, yum update will update all the packages on the system; i.e. both the system packages and the LumenVox software. You may keeping your system packages fully updated without affecting the LumenVox software packages themselves. To achieve that, exclude the LumenVox repository from the update list with:

yum update --disablerepo=LumenVox

Stopping and re-starting the LumenVox services is not needed in this scenario. But a system reboot may be needed due to system packages updates.

Updating the LumenVox packages only

If you want to update the LumenVox packages alone, you can do this by explicitly listing the LumenVox products you have installed, e.g.

yum update LumenVoxClient LumenVoxTTS

You will have to stopping and re-start the LumenVox services as described above.


               

32-bit vs 64-bit LumenVox Software

At this time, LumenVox supports 64-bit flavors of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS versions 6 and 7, and also the 32-bit version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS version 7 . As long as your repository files are setup correctly as described above using the $basearch variable, yum should automatically download and install the 32- or 64-bit version to fit your architecture.

Currently, some TTS packages are only available as 32-bit packages. These are tested on 64-bit flavor of both CentOS version 6 and 7, and should install and run alongside the the other 64-bit packages.

Installing RPMs Without adding the YUM repository

It is possible to install the LumenVox software without modifying the YUM configuration. This should be done only when strictly needed, since it is error prone.

See Downloading the Software for instructions on obtaining the needed RPMs. They are named in the format LumenVoxPRODUCT-X. Y-Z.DISTRIBUTION.ARCH.rpm where PRODUCT is the desired product (e.g. LicenseServer), X.Y-Z represents the software's version number, DISTRIBUTION is the Linux distribution they are to be used for and ARCH is the desired architecture.

You can use yum to install the LumenVox RPMs by typing
yum --nogpgcheck localinstall LumenVoxPRODUCT-X. Y-Z.DISTRIBUTION.ARCH.rpm
This will also install any needed system dependencies. However, see the next section about the libjs-specific dependency issues; the recommended course of action is to download the libjs RPM from the LumenVox repositories.

To save time, you can also list all packages to be installed in a single command (including all the dependencies), e.g.
yum --nogpgcheck localinstall LumenVoxCore-X.Y-Z.DISTRIBUTION.ARCH.rpm js-1.60-1. DISTRIBUTION.ARCH.rpm LumenVoxClient-X.Y-Z.DISTRIBUTION.ARCH.rpm LumenVoxLicenseServer-X.Y-Z.DISTRIBUTION.ARCH.rpm

If yum is not available, you can use the low-level rpm tool by typing
rpm -Uvh LumenVoxLicenseServer-X.Y-Z.DISTRIBUTION.ARCH.rpm
NOTE: You will have to manually fix the missing dependencies, if any.

Log out and log back in to your machine after installation completes.

Libjs Problems on Red Hat ES or CentOS

LumenVox Version 13.1

Changes introduced with LumenVox version 13.1 removed the need to install a system version of libjs, which at times could have been problematic for users. Since the introduction of 13.1, LumenVox products now ship with its own version of the Spider Monday (JS) libraries, which are used when processing Semantic Interpretation results.

This means that users of LumenVox 13.1 or later do not need to install any special versions of libjs as described below

LumenVox requires a particular version of libjs, the Mozilla implementation of JavaScript, installed on your system. It is not available in the default Red Hat or CentOS yum repositories.

For convenience, LumenVox includes the version of libjs we build and test against in our yum repositories, so if you use yum to install our products and have added the LumenVox repository to your system, yum should be able to fetch it automatically. Else, download it manually using the instructions on our Downloading the Software page.

If you prefer not using our libjs RPM, you can obtain the source from the official Mozilla site and build it yourself. Alternatively, many sites offer compiled RPMs of the library. LumenVox cannot certify or support these third-party RPMs, but for your convenience one such location is http://dag.wieers.com/rpm/packages/js/

For convenience, we have also hosted the compatible Linux js packages on our website under the http://www.lumenvox.com/packages location, which you can download and install according to your specific operating system. For example:

CentOS7/EL7 32-bit and 64-bit


these versions do not require the libjs package


CentOS6/EL6 64-bit


wget http://www.lumenvox.com/packages/EL6/x86_64/js-1.60-1.el6.rf.x86_64.rpm
-or-
wget http://dag.wieers.com/rpm/packages/js/js-1.60-1.el6.rf.x86_64.rpm

then:

yum localinstall js-1.60-1.el6.rf.x86_64.rpm


CentOS5/EL5 64-bit


wget http://www.lumenvox.com/packages/EL5/x86_64/js-1.60-1.el5.rf.x86_64.rpm
-or-
wget http://dag.wieers.com/rpm/packages/js/js-1.60-1.el5.rf.x86_64.rpm

then:

yum localinstall js-1.60-1.el5.rf.x86_64.rpm


CentOS5/EL5 32-bit


wget http://www.lumenvox.com/packages/EL5/i386/js-1.60-1.el5.rf.i386.rpm
-or-
wget http://dag.wieers.com/rpm/packages/js/js-1.60-1.el5.rf.i386.rpm

then:

yum localinstall js-1.60-1.el5.rf.i386.rpm


Working without a DNS

If you are installing the software on a node that does not have an active DNS entry, you will need to manually map the used IP address to the system name resolution configuration.

To determine if DNS is properly setup on this node, run a DNS lookup.

A properly setup system would look something like this:

[root@mynode ~]# echo `uname -n`
mynode.mycc.com
[root@mynode ~]# host `uname -n`
mynode.mycc.com has address 101.123.1.2
[root@mynode ~]# ping `uname -n`
PING mynode.mycc.com ( 101.123.1.2 ) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from mynode.mycc.com ( 101.123.1.2 ): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.070 ms


While a node without a DNS entry will be

[root@mynode ~]# echo `uname -n`
mynode.mycc.com
[root@mynode ~]# host `uname -n`
Host mynode.mycc.com not found: 3(NXDOMAIN)
[root@mynode ~]# ping `uname -n`
ping: unknown host mynode.mycc.com

PS: The relevant test is the ping one; as long as ping can find your host, you are fine.

If ping could not find your node, pick the IP address of the desired network interface (you can use ifconfig for this task), and add it to the /etc/hosts file. For example:

[root@mynode ~]# myip= 101.123.1.2
[root@mynode ~]# echo "$myip `uname -n`" >> /etc/hosts
[root@mynode ~]# ping `uname -n`
PING mynode.mycc.com ( 101.123.1.2 ) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from mynode.mycc.com ( 101.123.1.2 ): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.070 ms


Before moving on

After you have installed the software, see Licensing Overview to get started licensing your software.